Skip to main content
Princeton Theological Seminary

2023 Barth Graduate Student Colloquium

Barth & Politics

June 14–17, 2023

Center for Barth Studies
Application Closed

Princeton Theological Seminary

2023 Barth Graduate Student Colloquium

Center for Barth Studies

The Center for Barth Studies at Princeton Theological Seminary is pleased to announce the fifth Karl Barth Graduate Student Colloquium to be held on June 14–17, 2023. This year’s theme is Barth and politics—broadly conceived as a constructive and critical engagement with Barth’s own politics, political theory, and political theology in conversation with contemporary conversations on the same. Over the course of three days, participants will have the opportunity to engage in an intensive student-led seminar and to get to know other up-and-coming Barth scholars. During the day, participants will take turns presenting papers and leading group discussion on an assigned portion of the text. Two senior scholars will supplement the student-led day sessions by providing evening lectures and opportunities to further the conversation.

We particularly welcome proposals for this year’s colloquium from women, people of color, those who are a part of the LGBTQI+ community, international students, and others who are a part of marginalized communities—those whose voices are often, and have long been, and continue to be underrepresented within the theological academy.

Speakers

Princeton Theological Seminary

Dr. Hanna Reichel

Associate Professor of Reformed Theology

Dr. Reichel is Associate Professor of Reformed Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary. Also holding a B.Sc. in economics from Fernuniversität Hagen, they earned their Doc. theol. and MDiv from Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg. Apart from a monograph titled, Theologie als Bekenntnis. Karl Barths kontextuelle Lektüre des Heidelberger Catechisms (FSÖTh, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015), they have published articles on Barth’s theology of scripture, missiology, theological method, and Christology. Reichel’s teaching ranges across doctrinal loci (doctrine of God, Christology, eschatology) and from postcolonial and feminist epistemologies to political theology. Their research interests include theological method, epistemic justice, political theology, digital theology, and queer theology.
Candler School of Theology, Emory University

Rev. Dr. Ted Smith

Charles Howard Candler Professor of Divinity

The Rev. Dr. Ted Smith works at the intersections of practical and political theology. Smith’s first book, The New Measures, tells a history of preaching that gives rise to eschatological visions of modern democracy. His second book, Weird John Brown, works through memories of the raid on Harpers Ferry to show the limits of social ethics for thinking about violence. Smith has edited collections of essays on sexuality and ordination, contemporary issues in preaching, and economic inequality. He is currently editing a series of books on the meanings and purposes of theological education in a time of great change.

At Emory, Smith also teaches in the Graduate Division of Religion and is an affiliated faculty member with the Center for the Study of Law and Religion. Beyond Emory, Smith serves as a senior fellow with the University of Virginia’s project on Religion and Its Publics, the steering committee of the Political Theology Network, and a member of the editorial boards for Political Theology and Practical Matters. He recently completed two terms on the board of the Louisville Institute.

Colloquium Presenters

Doctoral Candidate

Morgan Bell

Emmanuel College in the University of Toronto

Morgan Bell (he/him) is a doctoral candidate at Emmanuel College in the University of Toronto. His doctoral research explores Karl Barth’s doctrine of God the Father in the light of contemporary trinitarian, queer, and feminist discourses. Morgan is in ministry in The United Church of Canada, serving on the Roman Catholic-United Church National Dialogue and at St. Andrew’s United Church in downtown Toronto.

DPhil Student

Eckhart Chan

University of Oxford

I am a first-year DPhil student in modern theology at the University of Oxford. My research is broadly focused on the legacy of nineteenth-century Christian theology, and the topic of my dissertation is on the pneumatological dimensions of Ernst Troeltsch’s theology. Most recently, before moving to the UK, I was working at a Chinese church in Seattle, my hometown. Prior to that, I earned a BA in Philosophy, Religion, and Classics from Calvin University, and an MAR in Philosophy of Religion from Yale Divinity School.

PhD student

Frank Della Torre

Baylor University

Frank Della Torre is a PhD student in Theological Studies at Baylor University. He holds a MATS from Princeton Theological Seminary and a BA in Philosophy from Wheaton College (IL). His primary research interest focuses on the political theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, particularly Bonhoeffer’s conception of the divine mandates (family, labor, government, and church), as a constructive resource for contemporary Christian social ethics. His secondary research interests are in modern and political theology as well as modern philosophy and continental philosophy of religion.

Doctoral Candidate

Jason Oliver Evans

University of Virginia

Jason Oliver Evans (he/him/his) is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. Evans is a constructive theologian working at the intersection of Christian systematic theology with theological and social ethics, Black critical thought, Africana religious criticism, Black feminist theory and queer theory. Evans primarily studies the areas of Christology, soteriology, creation, and theological anthropology. In his work, Evans considers how the interrelationship of race, sexuality, and gender broadly factors into the study of Christian faith and practice. Previously, Evans earned a Master of Arts in Religious Studies from the University of Virginia (2022), a Master of Theology from Candler School of Theology at Emory University (2013), a Master of Divinity from Duke University Divinity School (2012), and a Bachelor of Science in speech communication from Millersville University of Pennsylvania (2008). An ordained minister in the American Baptist Churches USA, Inc., Evans currently serves as an associate minister at the historic St. Paul’s Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In his spare time, Evans enjoys cooking, baking, reading cookbooks and food magazines, and binge-watching cooking shows.

Doctoral Candidate

Antavius Franklin

Fordham University

Antavius Franklin is a Ph.D. Candidate in Systematic Theology at Fordham University. He works at the intersections of black (religious) study, theological anthropology, Afrofuturism, and sound studies. His research primarily focuses on how the sonic (Jazz and Southern Hip Hop) challenges and expands our conceptions of blackness and its relationship to time and space in modernity to rethink blackness’ relationship to both eschatology and revelation. He is also interested in reading and engaging both afropessimist and black nihilist discourses to explore antiblackness as a theological concern that sits at the center of the study of black religion and theology.

Doctoral Candidate

Joe Kauslick

Boston University School of Theology

Joe Kauslick is a researcher, educator, and practitioner in Christian theology and ministry, and a PhD Candidate in Theological Studies with a Certificate in Religion and Conflict Transformation at Boston University School of Theology. With his partner, Anna, he also co-administrates and lives at the International Fellowship House in Boston, MA, a faith-based housing community of international students from all backgrounds. His dissertation is a political theology of accountability inspired by the theology of Karl Barth in conversation with the pragmatist philosophy of Robert Brandom and the democratic traditionalism of Jeffrey Stout. The theopolitical conception of accountability he provides makes use of, develops, and extends pragmatist work in democracy to fruitfully develop a Barth-inspired understanding of accountability useful for Christian and democratic discourses. His scholarship emphasizes the intersection of and dialogue between theological reflection and inquiry in the academy and in ecclesial, public, lay and political communities and institutions; investigates the role of Christian people, practices, and reflection in secular or pluralistic communities and endeavors; and seeks to identify, analyze, critique, and dialectically overcome polarizations endemic to public and academic Christian theological discourse and practice through rigorous philosophical analysis. He deploys and advocates for his own Christian and democratic commitments, employs immanent criticism and charitable readings of alternative perspectives, and offers his point of view to any and all who share an interest and stake in the topics he addresses and the proposals he makes—thus making them public.

Master's Student of Theology

Maxine King

Virginia Theological Seminary

Maxine King is a master’s student of theology at Virginia Theological Seminary. Her current writing is on Karl Barth and the God-world relationship in trans theology. She is an enthusiastic lay person and cantor in the Episcopal Church.

Doctoral Candidate

Enoch H. Kuo

Princeton University

Enoch H. Kuo (he/him) is a doctoral candidate in the department of Religion at Princeton University. His research sits at the intersections of theology, political theory, and the history of science. His dissertation, “Schleiermacher’s Rechtslehre: Political Economy, Sovereignty, and Right in Political-Theological Perspective” attempts to recover the significance of F.D.E. Schleiermacher’s innovative political philosophy for re-envisioning conversations about religion and science through a political lens more attentive to the power-dynamics which structure scientific and ecclesiological endeavors.

PhD Student

David Le

Emory University

David is a PhD student in Theological Studies at Emory University. His research involves understanding the legacy of Christian supersessionism and the theopolitical potentials for post-supersessionism. Working at the intersection of politics, ethics, and conventional systematic theology, he hopes to develop new ways of understanding the identity of the church in contemporary society.

Doctoral Candidate

Sara Mannen

University of Aberdeen

Sara Mannen currently lives in Aberdeen, Scotland with her husband and two daughters. She is finishing her PhD on the concept of divine personhood in Karl Barth at the University of Aberdeen under the supervision of Tom Greggs. Sara’s current work is reflected in her recently published article on the topic of Barth and divine personhood. Before relocating to the UK, Sara received her master’s degree in Theological Studies at Multnomah University where she taught systematic theology. Sara’s theological interests include modern and contemporary doctrine of God, patristic theology, and the connection between systematic theology and other theological disciplines. Sara’s passion for theology is matched by her love for teaching theology from the university classroom to her local church and community.

Doctoral Candidate

Shelly Penton

University of Virginia

Shelly Penton is a Ph.D. Candidate in Modern and Contemporary Religious Thought at the University of Virginia. Her research lies at the intersection of religious studies, memory studies, and media studies. More specifically, her work grapples with narrations of race and history in contemporary film, turning to cultural memory studies and the Jewish and Christian traditions to rethink epistemological questions and categories. Penton holds an MDiv from Vanderbilt University and an MA in Religion, Literature, and Visual Culture from the University of Chicago.

Hope Trust Postdoctoral Fellow

Nicola Whyte

University of Aberdeen

Nicola is the Hope Trust Postdoctoral Fellow in Systematic Theology at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. She is currently working on a project on a Reformed theology of nationhood. Prior to moving to Aberdeen, Nicola undertook her PhD and Master's studies at Princeton Theological Seminary, and her undergraduate degree at the University of Edinburgh, as well as working in various roles within the Church of Scotland. Her doctoral dissertation engages Karl Barth on sin, evil, and the lordless powers, thinking toward a constructive hamartiology for the Reformed tradition in the twenty-first century. Her other interests include feminist theology, the doctrines of election and justification, ethics and human agency, and Scottish theology. She also loves novels, travel, folk music, and the beach.
Doctoral Candidate

Darren Yau

Princeton University

Darren is a graduate student in the Department of Religion at Princeton University in the religion, ethics, and politics subfield. He writes at the intersection of political theory and religious ethics. His current research project is on the philosophy of non-violence and democratic theory in the 20th century.

Schedule

This is a provisional schedule and subject to change.

All presentations to be delivered in the Center for Barth Studies Reading Room (#3173 – 3rd floor of Wright Library’s North Wing) unless otherwise stated.

Wednesday, June 14, 2023

Time (ET)

Session

12:00PM ET

Check-in begins

6:30- 8:30PM ET

Welcome reception

Thursday, June 15, 2023

Time (ET)

Session

8:00- 9:00AM ET

Breakfast

9:00- 9:45AM ET

Introductions

9:45- 10:00AM ET

Break

10:00- 11:00AM ET

Presentation 1

11:00AM- 12:00PM ET

Presentation 2

12:00- 1:00PM ET

Lunch

1:15- 2:15PM ET

Presentation 3

2:15- 2:45PM ET

Break

2:45- 3:45PM ET

Presentation 4

3:45- 4:45PM ET

Presentation 5

4:45- 6:30PM ET

Break

6:30- 9:00PM ET

Dinner

Friday, June 16, 2023

Time (ET)

Session

8:00- 8:45AM ET

Breakfast

8:45- 9:45AM ET

Presentation 6

9:45- 10:00AM ET

Break

10:00- 11:00AM ET

Presentation 7

11:00AM- 12:00PM ET

Lecture – Dr. Hanna Reichel

12:00- 1:00PM ET

Lunch

1:15- 2:15PM ET

Presentation 8

2:15- 2:45PM ET

Break

2:45- 3:30PM ET

Presentation 9

3:30- 4:30PM ET

Overview of Barth Collection

5:30- 7:00PM ET

Break

7:00- 9:00PM ET

Break

Saturday, June 17, 2023

Time (ET)

Session

8:00- 9:00AM ET

Breakfast

9:00- 10:00AM ET

Presentations 10

10:00- 10:30AM ET

Break

10:30- 11:30AM ET

Presentation 11

12:00- 1:00PM ET

Lunch

1:00- 2:00PM ET

Presentation 12

2:00- 2:30PM ET

Break

2:30- 3:30PM ET

Presentation 13

3:30- 4:00PM ET

Closing Remarks

4:00- 5:30PM ET

Break

5:30- 7:00PM ET

Lecture — Dr. Ted Smith

7:00- 9:00PM ET

Closing Dinner

Travel Directions

By Air

From Newark Liberty International Airport The Olympic Airporter shuttle service takes you to the Nassau Inn in Princeton; call for schedule and reservations: 800.822.9797 (within the United States) or 732.938.6666 (outside the United States), or visit www.olympicairporter.com The AirTrain takes you from all airport terminals to the Newark Liberty International Airport Train Station. Take New Jersey Transit southbound (Northeast Corridor Line) trains to Princeton Junction. From Princeton Junction take the train to Princeton Station. From Philadelphia International Airport Take the R1 High Speed Rail Line (entrance on pedestrian bridges and commercial roadway), limousine service (The Olympic Airporter; call for reservations: 800.822.9797 within the United States or 732.938.6666 outside the United States, or visit www.olympicairporter.com), or local taxi service to 30th Street Station in Philadelphia, where you can purchase a SEPTA/New Jersey Transit ticket to take a SEPTA train to Trenton and a New Jersey Transit train to Princeton Junction. From Princeton Junction take the train to Princeton Station.

By Bus

From Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City (41st Street and 8th Avenue) Purchase a Suburban Transit bus ticket to Princeton at windows 16 through 19 on the first floor. Board the bus on the third floor (fourth level) at gates 420 through 422. The bus leaves every half hour between 6:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. on weekdays and between 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. on weekends, and every half hour on the hour until 1:00 a.m. The trip is one and one-half hours. Ask the driver to let you off at the end of Nassau Street where it meets Mercer Street and Route 206 in Princeton, and walk to the Seminary.

By Train

From New York City (and north) and Philadelphia (and south) New Jersey Transit services Princeton from the north (New York City, Newark), with connecting service from the south (Trenton, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC). Amtrak trains stop in Trenton, and some at Princeton Junction.

By Car

From the North/New York City Take the New Jersey Turnpike South to Exit 9 (New Brunswick). After the toll booths, bear right onto the ramp for Route 18 North. Shortly after getting onto Route 18 North the road will fork; stay to the left of the fork, in the right lane. Bear right onto this exit for Route 1 South/Trenton. Follow Route 1 South to Alexander Road (Princeton). Turn right onto Alexander Road and continue to the entrance of Princeton Seminary, which is the first left turn after College Road (Alexander Road will be Alexander Street at this point). From the West Take I-78 East into New Jersey. Exit onto I-287 South toward Somerville. Follow signs for Routes 202/206 South. Travel south on 202 for a short distance and then follow signs for Route 206 South. You will go around a traffic circle. Continue south on Route 206 for about eighteen miles to Nassau Street (Route 27) in the center of Princeton. Turn left onto Nassau Street and the first right onto Mercer Street and continue to the main entrance of Princeton Seminary, which will be on your left. From the South From southern New Jersey take I-295 North (becomes I-95 South) to the “Princeton Pike North” exit and continue on Princeton Pike for approximately five miles. Immediately after passing Library Place (on the left), the main entrance to the campus will be on your right. From the East Take I-95 West toward Trenton to the exit for I-295 North (becomes I-95 South) to the “Princeton Pike North” exit and continue on Princeton Pike for approximately five miles. Immediately after passing Library Place (on the left), the main entrance to the campus will be on your right. From Philadelphia Take I-95 North into New Jersey and exit at “Princeton Pike North” and continue on Princeton Pike for approximately five miles. Immediately after passing Library Place (on the left), the main entrance to the campus will be on your right.

Center for Barth Studies

The Center for Barth Studies exists to provide leading resources on the theology and legacy of Swiss Reformed theologian Karl Barth (1886–1968). The center hosts programs and events, provides research resources, and facilitates constructive theological conversation for engagement with the Christian theological tradition and its public significance today.

Contact

If you have any questions or concerns, email us at [email protected] or call us at 609-524-1981. Please allow at least three business days for an email response.

We are especially grateful to the McDonald Agape Foundation for its investment in emerging Barth scholars through the funding of this colloquium and its scholarship.